Monday, May 4, 2009

Oyster Island co Sligo

This is actually the first lighthouse that you see when coming into Rosses Point but probably viewed best from the coastal path at the head of Rosses Point, from where the Metal Man is best seen. To me, it looks remarkably similar to the Baily Lighthouse in Howth.
Erected in 1821, the same year as the Metal Man, the lights in both lighthouses were changed from gas-powered to solar in 2003.
A brilliant description of life in Oyster Island lighthouse in the 1930s can be found on the Coomissioner for Irish Lights website at http://www.cil.ie/sh621x4185.html

Metal Man Light co Sligo

Located in the narrow waters between the mainland and Oyster Island off Rosses Point, the nearest view to the Metal Man Light is probably gained from walking down the coastal pathway for 100 yards. The cast iron sailor warns ships away from the rocks - the light is beside him.
Erected in 1821, the Metal Man has an identical twin that stands guard on the south coast of Tramore Bay in county Waterford. However, his Waterford sibling is on land and stands atop a much taller pillar.

Blackrock Lighthouse co. Sligo

Above is an old picture of the Blackrock Light. The little external rooms at the top of the staircase were added in the 1870s to give extra accommodation but were removed in the 1970s.
May Bank Holiday weekend and, a bit poemed out, we decided to take a break from the Strokestown International Poetry Competition, and travel up to Rosses Point in county Sligo. Following the road in to the long drawn out village, we eventually reached the headland where we had three lighthouses in view at the same time.
I was sorry I didn't have my camcorder with me as it has a greater zoom than my camera. Therefore these pictures of Blackrock Light (not to be confused with Blackrock Light in Mayo) are a bit far away.

Located on a rocky islet, a light was placed on here in the late 1700s but was washed away in a storm. The lighthouse is white with a black band and access is gained by a red spiral staircase which reaches halfway up the outside.